The Line Between Preparedness and Paranoia (S3E11)

In this episode, I update you on a major decision I had to make in order to keep my immunocompromised son safe during the COVID19 pandemic. Very few things are simple with it comes to Special Needs parenting and I share the thought process that goes into making potentially life-altering decisions for my kids. I also talk about a few other things that are on my mind and I curse a bit. 😉

I also want to apologize to my mother for the language in this episode. I’m feeling terribly overwhelmed and I needed to vent a bit. Sorry, Mom.

I wanted to provide you with a list of reliable sources for information regarding COVID19. Facts, science medicine and accurate, truthful information matters now more than ever. These are some of the people and medical facilities that I trust and rely on for information about this pandemic. Please give them a follow.

Dr. Tara C. Smith

Professor, infectious disease epidemiologist



Twitter: twitter.com/aetiology

Website: aracsmith.com

Cleveland Clinic

Twitter: twitter.com/clevelandclinic

Website: clevelandclinic.org

Mayo Clinic

Twitter:twitter.com/mayoclinic

Website: mayoclinic.org

CDC

Twitter: twitter.com/cdcgov

Website: cdc.gov

Support This Podcast

You can find me: theautismdad.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/theautismdad

This episode is sponsored by Mightier. Mightier is an amazing program out of Harvard Medical and Boston Children’s. It uses video games to teach kids to emotionally self-regulate. Visit theautismdad.com/mightier and find out more information, including how to get a free 30 day trial.

This episode is brought to you by Probably Genetic. Probably Genetics is helping me with my oldest, who suffers from multiple rare genetic diseases. Probably Genetic is helping me to find the answers to questions that have long gone unanswered. Probably Genetic specializes in identifying rare genetic diseases that often go undiagnosed, especially in children already diagnosed with Autism. They are on a mission to make full genetic sequencing accessible to those who need it. They significantly reduced the cost and drastically reduced the wait time as well. If you are one of the countless people in need of genetic testing, please visit probablygenetic.com to find out more and use the discount code “theautismdad400” to get $400 off. If you already had a whole exome or whole genome test done but didn’t get an answer, they can re-analyze your existing data. If you don’t have the data available, they’ll help you get it from your lab free of charge. You can join their re-analysis waitlist at https://www.probablygenetic.com/waitlist.html.”

Please take a minute and answer a few survey questions. This helps Probably Genetic better understand how best to help families like mine. Click Here

This episode is brought to you by AngelSense. Wandering is a huge problem in the Autism community and it’s reached epidemic levels. AngelSense is working to save the lives of Autistic kids who wander, by empowering parents with GPS tracking tools that helps them to immediately intervene should an episode of elopement occur. Visit angelsense.com for more information.

1 comment



    • BJW on March 25, 2020 at 2:17 am
    • Reply

    Ok. I hear your concern. I have some ideas for your sons. FIRST, Gavin. Even if he’s living in an alternate reality in his mind, it might be interesting. For example, can he write stories about what he does? Can he draw the people he sees? Do origami that represents his thoughts? I guess where I’m going is that even if he isn’t in touch with reality, his fantasy might be interesting applied to arts. And art and craft can be found online. Might help him to find a was to express himself that isn’t solely him talking your ears off.

    Okay, now for Emmett and Elliott. Do either of them like any arts & crafts? Maybe now would be the time to experiment. A not expensive suggestion: maybe you all could learn a musical instrument? A soprano recorder is easy to blow, simple to learn tunes, and a student model is cheap. As a musician, I think any person can only be improved by learning music. I mentioned the recorder because I think you could learn and teach it to them. Just a thought. I’m sure there are videos too. Or singing? Even singing is good and can make someone happier. You can even buy electronic keyboards relatively cheap on eBay ($40). \

    There are also cheaper types of instruments. I do default to music as a Bachelor of Music, but crafts are so cool. Art is awesome. Even just coloring something they like is good for them.

    Emmett sounds very tuned into what is what. He’s obviously so bright! That kid could do his own podcasts directed to other kids like him. Just throwing out ideas.

    Now, as adults Jacob and Henry do Magic the Gathering and different role-playing things (DnD). And we’re so lucky there is so much to be found on the internet. You can go to a website with a piano keyboard and play a song on your laptop!

    Anyhow, maybe all these ideas are bad. Oh, I almost forgot, photography is an art. Even just trying to take pics with a phone is a start. I know you like to take pics. Do you all have a garden? Maybe growing something in your back yard would be different?

    Sorry for all of this. But if one idea is helpful, then I would be glad. Anyway, Henry used to like origami quite a bit. It wasn’t until he became quite sick that he lost interest. For example, for one Christmas I gave him origami paper airplanes that needed to be folded. Darn, I miss all of this but I can’t imagine having to go through the lockdown as a single parent with 3 special needs sons!

    Jacob is still working at Marco’s and at least he’s OCD about cleanliness. So when he comes home he changes his clothes, and his work clothes get washed in hot water while he showers. sigh It’s such an adjustment for all of us, and we’re lucky to live in Ohio, for the most part. I think DeWine wants to do the best for us.

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