Operation Hope: The Journey Begins

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This morning we had our very first meeting with Wraparound. This meeting was to collect information and make introductions. Our worker is really nice and very eager to help us locate services that could benefit my family.

Today was basically, spent signing releases and collecting information, as I said earlier.

They will be pulling records and communicating with Dr. Reynolds, Dr. Patti, Akron Children’s Hospital and The Cleveland Clinic. Releases were also signed for the school as well as our parents.

As I previously stated, our worker is very eager to help my Lost and Tired family to obtain some desperately needed help, in multiple areas of our lives.



As with the rest of life, nothing here is guaranteed. However, the way I look at this is nothing ventured, nothing gained. We may walk away from this with a stronger support system in place. We may also find that we have truly exhausted our options.

I’m choosing to be as positive as I can because my demeanor will set the tone for those around me.

Over the next few weeks, we will be meeting again and begin building our support team. This support team will consist of family and friends that want to help and support us, as well as many of the professionals in our lives as well. This is a really cool aspect of this program because they are seeking to help distribute the weight of what we are carrying.

Anyway, that was our very first Wraparound meeting and it lasted maybe an hour.

Read This  Married to #Autism

I realize that nothing has changed but at the same time, it feels as though we are slowly beginning to reclaim control over our lives.

This is something the Lost and Tired family is in desperate need of. I would like to thank our Wraparound coordinator for taking the time to meet with us this morning and for being as positive as she was. 🙂



  • Chloe123 says:

    Was the board of developmental disabilities able to help you at all?

  • Mary Franzen Costell says:

    Good to hear.

  • Dearest_Nikky says:

    if there is anything I can do….;)

  • Jenn50 says:

    You are absolutely right about your attitude setting the tone!  I have so many friends with kids with special needs who go into schools, doctors and social workers with a "MY KID HAS RIGHTS AND YOU AREN'T GOING TO SCREW ME OVER!" attitude.  They get met with defensiveness and resistance.  I go in armed with a smile, and the first thing I say is, "I know everyone here has Michaela's best interests at heart.  That's the most important point.  The rest is details.  We'll sort that out.  We'll tweak it together.  But I appreciate that you're all here rooting for my daughter."  Then I hand them all of my documentation from the panels of experts who have been involved in her care.  I get MUCH better results.  The schools that tell the angry mom that "there's not much we can do for you." not only bend over backwards to help us, but advocate for us in other situations.  By setting up the expectation that you think they're going to be reasonable and helpful, it sets a much more positive tone, and people are much more likely to go above and beyond for your family. 
     
    Good luck.  I know your family desperately needs some help.

    • lostandtired says:

       @Jenn50  I think it goes back to the whole bee's with honey thing. No one HAS to help us. By treating the people helping us with respect and showing our gratitude with a smile, I think everything becomes more productive. We would be that way anyway but good people skills definitely work to our advantage.