I totally forgot to tell you

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I was so completely overwhelmed by the doctors appointment this afternoon that I forgot to mention what happened with Elliott’s bloodwork. I gotta be honest, Lizze and I both were exhausted after the appointment. The boys were such a handful and like the Energizer Bunny, they kept going and going.

Anyway, as far as Elliott’s bloodwork went, it didn’t.

While we are making some progress because he’s now able to talk about it without freaking out, he still wasn’t ready to go today. We’ve talked it over with his doctor and while they’d like him to just get it done, the understand and agree with our approach. We’re looking longterm on this and not just a fix for this one time.

I’m hoping that the Prozac will help him relax a bit more and manage his anxiety better. We’re going to be continue working on new coping skills but medication is a necessary part of this.



We’ll see how it goes.

Recommended Read  Nothing New

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kimmy+gebhardt
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kimmy+gebhardt

You’re right that you don’t owe anyone anything, but blowing off honest comments and questions because you don’t want to answer them isn’t helpful and can leave a bad taste about the Autistic community as a whole. You often say that you have a platform, so why not help educate the masses (such as myself) as to why certain things won’t work, or why those of us without autistic children should support our tax dollars going to help those of you whose children are on the spectrum. If someone asks a question and you give the [predictable] response of ‘you… Read more »

Dutch
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Dutch

Can you explain how giving him the option of when the blood will be drawn is helping? I get the allowing kids power over some choices, but I don’t see how this could possibly be one of them. Doctors appointments are scheduled and not always easy to get. Especially with your schedule…and what happens if he chooses not to again? Now you delayed the invetible and removed the power of choice anyway. Anxiety or not I would think the learning opportunity would have been ‘life sucks sometimes we have to do things we don’t like and it will be over… Read more »

Jimmy Rock
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Jimmy Rock

I’m interested in the response to Dutch’s question myself. I’ll just add that as a parent of one autistic child and one NT child, it just so happens that my NT child is the one who’s afraid of needles. And not just afraid — while it’s gotten better, she used to be the kid whose screams pierce the eardrums in everyone in the waiting room and leave them wondering what the hell is going on in there. But we’ve always dealt with it in a similar fashion as Dutch alluded to in his comment. And if it had been my… Read more »

Pony
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Pony

I believe Jimmy has asked several times about what coping mechanisms you all work on and never seems to get an answer. You made a post a while back about teaching the boys life lessons at the grocery store which is all well and good. But a more important life lesson would be to teach them how to cope. What kinds of things are you working on consistently to help deal with meltdowns? Meltdowns will always occur, but you can teach kids and adults how to deal with them and manage them, it is possible. Especially since your kids are… Read more »

Dutch
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Dutch

Nothing about what We said would be easy. It’s actually ridiculously hard to do what’s we suggested. Anxiety or fear of needles really wouldn’t matter; the impact on the kid would be the same. I asked for an understanding of your thought process in coming to this latest idea…which would be helpful to anyone reading…instead you went back to the well of ‘I’ve got this’ and ‘I don’t need suggestions’. Just because someone might have another idea doesn’t mean they are thinking less of your idea. It’s really an off putting way to respond to people who are only offering… Read more »

Jimmy Rock
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Jimmy Rock

Rob, I’m not taking your response as snippy at all, and I hope you don’t with mine. But I’ll admit that your response was a bit predictable. The “my situation is unique” response is undoubtedly true, but not helpful as far as being enlightening or educating. Everyone’s situation is unique, but there are always commonalities. And you haven’t explained what is so unique or complex about this anxiety situation that it requires an approach that you perceive to be “out of the box.” And I don’t think your approach is “out of the box” anyway. As I stated in my… Read more »

Jimmy Rock
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Jimmy Rock

[Sorry, won’t let me reply] Rob, I appreciate the response. I hear you. I get it. You know, I first came across your blog closer to the beginning of my journey, when, like many others, I was looking for answers, for like-minded people, and for access to any information that could possibly help me and my family. At this point I consider myself a reasonably enlightened individual with respect to providing my family with what it needs, and I consider it a very fortunate position to be in. I understand the public service aspect of what you’re trying to do… Read more »

Pony
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Pony

I’d like to add to what Jimmy said, maybe it isn’t that people are questioning your every move or motive but that they need more explanation. You tend to get defensive right off the bat rather than explaining things or saying, hey we might try that next time, or yeah we tried that and it didn’t work. Not every post that doesn’t mesh with yours is a judgement or criticism

Sophie
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Sophie

Out of interest do help your kids with emotional regulation? Do you use visuals and the ther aids to help with their anxiety and manage their day??

As a disclosure I have two boys on the spectrum (5.5 and 9), we’re newish on the ASD journey but I find enormous success helping the boys to recognise emotions and helping give them the tools to manage those emotions. You talk about tablets and computer games a lot but that’s about it. To be honest I find use of electronics, whilst might give some peace, most times cause worse behaviour.

BeckyW
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BeckyW

My son Henry has 2 anxiety disorders along with fibromyalgia. So he’s been on Wellbutrin for years. However, he is an adult albeit a young one.

I had good success with fluoxetine (generic of Prozac) but once again, I wasn’t a child. Hopefully Elliott will calm down a little.