Review: @Otsimo is a fantastic educational app for kids with #Autism

If you’ve been following me for any length of time, you know that I’m a huge proponent of technology. I like to connect people with tech that can improve their quality of life, and this is especially true in the case of Autism parents.

As an Autism parent myself, I know first hand how challenging it can be. I also know that I need all the help I can get.

I utilize many forms of technology in my daily life. Apps are easily among the most common pieces of technology I utilize. I use apps to manage many aspects of my family’s everyday life. I’m even using the WordPress app to write this post.

Apps are amazing little pieces of software that can enrich our lives in ways we couldn’t possibly imagine just a decade ago.



Many families like mine, even use apps to help our kids on the Autism Spectrum learn to navigate their world better.

One such app is called Otsimo, and I wish options like this were available five or ten years ago.

I wanted to take a few minutes and introduce you to an app called Otsimo. Otsimo is a certified special education app for both Android and iOS.

Otsimo is designed for special needs children, ages 3 to 9. As you probably already know, every kid is different, and some may benefit from an app like this at a much older age. My oldest will be 20 years old in January, but cognitively he’s about 5 or 6 years old.

As I said, everyone is different, and Otsimo recognizes that.

Otsimo As Seen In

Otsimo is an app that gives you access to AAC and an extensive collection of 80+ ad-free games (in the premium version) designed specifically for special needs kids. AAC is dedicated to treating Autistic kids and those with other developmental disabilities through Language Acquisition through Motor Planning (LAMP). The idea is to help kids improve their communication skills, as well as their ability to focus on things that are of less interest to them.

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1 comment



  1. Great review. My 18-year old son loves Starfall, which has a similar set of games and activities. He starts stimming on the animations and sounds, so it’s really hard to know if it’s helping him, or if he’s just hooked on the sights and sounds.

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